Characteristics of Respondents Survey (CORE)

Participation Survey/General (PARTS/G)

Survey of Participation and Receptivity in Communities (SPARC)

Facilitators and Barriers Survey/Mobility (FABS/M)

Community Health Environment Checklist (CHEC)



For access to the surveys or for more information, contact David B. Gray, PhD

Community Based Outcome Measures

CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPONDENTS SURVEY

The Characteristics of Respondents Survey (CORE) identifies important information about the person participating in the research project. For more information, click here.

PARTICIPATION SURVEYS

PARTICIPATION SURVEY/GENERAL

The Participation Survey/General (PARTS/G) is a subjective assessment that asks about participation in 24 different major life activities. The PARTS/G surveys people with mobility, hearing or visual impairment. This tool was originally developed to survey only people with mobility impairments and was originally entitled The Participation Survey/Mobility (PARTS/M) and asks about participation in 20 different major life activities.  For more information, click here.

SURVEY OF PARTICIPATION AND RECEPTIVITY IN COMMUNITIES

The Survey of Participation and Receptivity in Communities (SPARC) is a subjective assessment that measures the quality of participation across 17 different sites in the community. For more information, click here.

ENVIRONMENT SURVEYS

FACILITATORS AND BARRIERS SURVEY/MOBILITY

The Facilitators and Barriers Survey/Mobility (FABS/M) is a subjective assessment that identifies how the participant with a mobility impairment interacts with several aspects of the environment. For more information, click here.

COMMUNITY HEALTH ENVIRONMENT CHECKLIST

The Community Health Environment Checklist (CHEC) is an objective assessment of community sites. It includes a glossary of terms and a rule book with pictures to demonstrate how measurements are taken. This tool was originally designed to assess a general building for maneuverability of people with mobility impairments. Since the survey was deemed valid and reliable (Gray et al), several versions of the CHEC have been created and tested to assess an array of specific buildings and to assess accessibility for people with vision and hearing impairments. For more information, click here.

 

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